Gateway Pacific Terminal

Proposed coal-export terminal would boost sagging local government budgets

By Rachel Lerman and Celeste Erickson

Officials in Ferndale are optimistic about how potential industrial development at the Gateway Pacific Terminal would help their struggling community.

“Everybody paid for Intalco,” Ferndale Mayor Gary Jensen said of the 2001 shuttering of a major aluminum smelter that is now running again. “The (Gateway) terminal would be important for the county because of those increased tax values. It will allow us to keep up with the growth of the county.”

If built, the proposed Gateway Pacific Terminal would stand between two existing heavy industries at Cherry Point, west of Ferndale, the BP Refinery and Alcoa-Intalco Works.

The proposed location would be outside the city limits in an unincorporated area.

Tax revenue from the project would go to sectors in Whatcom County including Fire District 7 as well as the Ferndale School District. The estimated property tax and new construction revenue would be divided into several public service districts in Whatcom County such as fire districts, schools, roads, libraries, cemeteries, emergency medical services and water and sewer systems.

The bulk of new money would come from the taxes levied during construction of the facility.

The 1,092-acre site would pay an estimated $54 million per year in state and local taxes during construction, and about $10 million annually after that.

Additional tax revenues generated by building the terminal could help keep tax rates low, said Whatcom County Assessor Keith Willnauer. After construction is completed in two to three years, the property would continue to buoy local tax coffers.

Officials hope to also see a spillover effect into Ferndale proper.  Ferndale has available land for industrial and retail growth, Jensen said.

“When industrial development does well, that affects a lot of people. Right now we are hurting,” Jensen said.